Reviews for Street Corner Arts Performances

Review: We Are Proud to Present a Presentation About the Herero of Namibia. . . by Street Corner Arts

Review: We Are Proud to Present a Presentation About the Herero of Namibia. . . by Street Corner Arts

by Michael Meigs
Published on December 06, 2018

WE ARE PROUD TO PRESENT is initially so entertaining and then such a conflagration of our unconscious assumptions that it is vital, necessary and ultimately inescapable theatre.

To what extent may good and decent people like ourselves be held responsible today for the vast evils of racism and genocide committed in modern history against the innocent and defenseless?

 

Put this way, it's an abstract and chilling theme statement.

 

We Are Proud to Present  a Presentation about the Herero of Namibia, Formerly Known as Southwest Africa, from the German SudwestAfrika, between the Years 1884-1915 -- the title's more than a ...

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Review: Pocatello by Street Corner Arts

Review: Pocatello by Street Corner Arts

by Michael Meigs
Published on December 14, 2017

Carlo Lorenzo Garcia's performance as Eddie is nuanced and riveting, an ache of tightly controlled emotion. It belongs on any of the "best of" lists drawn up for 2017-2018.

 

From Street Corner Arts' publicity photos for Pocatello you might think that this was going to be a story of a big Italilan family dinner. Lots of discussion, acrimony, anger, maybe even flying plates -- a nightmare over turkey and dressing. A sort of modern-day Sopranos translated to the barren plains of Idaho.

 

You'd be wrong. Way wrong.

 

Samuel D. Hunter's work concerns not a single quarreling family but three ...

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Review: Perfect Mendacity by Street Corner Arts

Review: Perfect Mendacity by Street Corner Arts

by Michael Meigs
Published on April 19, 2017

PERFECT MENDACITY's two acts fly by. The knowledgeable audience appreciated a clever well executed script and familiar faces giving strong performances. The evening had just the right mixture of suspense, contradiction and comedy.

Playwright Jason Wells has contributed a lot to the brand Street Corner Arts has established since their 2011 debut. Perfect Mendacity is the third of his oeuvre they've put on stage at the Hyde Park Theatre, which gives them a clean sweep of this Steppenwolf playwright's 2008 - 2016 work. Men of Tortuga and The North Plan share the same sardonic cynicism about U.S. businesses and government. It's no surprise to ...

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Review: Constellations, Street Corner Arts

Review: Constellations, Street Corner Arts

by Michael Meigs
Published on December 12, 2016

Playwright Payne and director Liz Fisher open up Marianne and Roland to one another, and as a result they expose our hearts as well.

I wanted to see it twice. I needed to see it twice. And it's been so much on my mind that last night in my sleep I worked for a long time on the wording for a review, only to have those decisive phrases dissolve when I roused fitfully in the darkness of the small hours.

 

Theatre space is plastic, transformable, and theatre time is elastic. Place your audience before a blank black stage ...

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Review: Orphans by Street Corner Arts

Review: Orphans by Street Corner Arts

by Michael Meigs
Published on August 27, 2016

ORPHANS presents a Peter Pan/Neverland scenario of amoral feral children for whom Michael Stuart turns up as sage con man and, in effect, a guiding guardian angel.

 

Aaron Johnson, co-producer and cast member, told Alex Garza during a CTX Live Theatre interview that he's been carrying around Lyle Kessler's 1983 drama Orphans since his freshman year in college. Street Corner Arts' new Sidewalk Series of semi-sponsored work has given him the opportunity to put it on stage. Or, rather, into one side of the Back Pack improv troupe's well hidden rehearsal space in east Austin.

 

To find ...

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Review: Bull by Street Corner Arts

Review: Bull by Street Corner Arts

by Michael Meigs
Published on April 18, 2016

'Bull' may leave a sour taste in your mouth, particularly after that last unendurably long fade in the final scene, but it's exactly the taste that playwright Mike Bartlett wants you to have.

Mike Bartlett's single-syllable title for this piece doesn't give much away. The playwright's a Brit, so perhaps Bull isn't intended to suggest the American message of unbelievable mendacity. The verb "to bully" is more to the point, for one of this work-team trio has every reason to complain of bullying, and does so.

 

For me the most vivid association is with the animal. Not for the power or muscle or ...

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