Reviews for Different Stages Performances

Review: 4000 Miles by Different Stages

Review: 4000 Miles by Different Stages

by Michael Meigs
Published on March 16, 2016

Our attention is held by the exposition of the protagonists old and young, but Herzog's work is essentially a Bildungsroman that runs a jumpy young Leo through life lessons, particularly concerning the opposite sex.

Amy Herog's 4000 Miles starts off pretty clunky and she deliberately withholds important chunks of background. It's 3 a.m and we're in a rent-controlled apartment in lower Manhattan, assuming that such accomodations still exist. Leo has just turned up in full biking gear and roused his grandmother Vera, evidently because he has nowhere else to go. In opening scenes the story is doled out: Leo's been incommunicado on a cross-country ...

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Review by Dr. David Glen Robinson (#3 of 3): FALLEN ANGELS by Noël Coward, Different Stages, January 8 - 30, 2016

Review by Dr. David Glen Robinson (#3 of 3): FALLEN ANGELS by Noël Coward, Different Stages, January 8 - 30, 2016

by David Glen Robinson
Published on January 17, 2016

The design credit to Paul Gilbert as cook for the champagne-splashed supper in Act II seemed highly appropriate and very well deserved.

Different Stages, one of Austin’s longest running theatre companies, presents Fallen Angels by Noel Coward, at Trinity Street Theater inside the First Baptist Church of Austin on Trinity Street.  The play dates to 1924, and it is one of several Coward plays that remains in the regular theatre repertoire.  Different Stages takes a fresh and lively approach to all its productions, and Fallen Angels is no exception to the rule. For those newly ...

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Review by Michael Meigs (#2 of 3): FALLEN ANGELS by Noël Coward, Different Stages, January 8 - 30, 2016

Review by Michael Meigs (#2 of 3): FALLEN ANGELS by Noël Coward, Different Stages, January 8 - 30, 2016

by Michael Meigs
Published on January 13, 2016

The lightheadedness and the lightheartedness of these women friends is charming. Director Norman Blumensaadt moves them smartly and cleverly about the stage.

Comedy is fundamental to the human condition. We laugh at the unexpected if it's pleasurable, and we laugh at the incongruous. Often the comic moment in art depends upon a certain distancing: it's funny when a clown slips on a banana peel but it's not funny when we do the same thing. And comedy can be cruel. Satire exposes and intensifies that which we find ridiculous. We poke fun at the pretentious ...

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Review by Brian Paul Scipione (#1 of 3): FALLEN ANGELS by Noël Coward, Different Stages, January 8 - 30, 2016

Review by Brian Paul Scipione (#1 of 3): FALLEN ANGELS by Noël Coward, Different Stages, January 8 - 30, 2016

by Brian Paul Scipione
Published on January 13, 2016

The comedic tension Different Stages' Fallen Angels has the riveting frenetic pace of a Wimbledon tennis match. Cheers to this production.

Martinis, Champagne and the Requisite Amount of Passion

 

“Don’t be young Jane!” Rebecca Robinson as Julia Sterroll shoots out icily at her longtime friend (both in and out of character) Emily Erington as Jane Banbury. In other words, be mature, respectable and a proper English wife: a task neither of them achieve after the first ten minutes of the play.  They are the titular Fallen Angels of Noel Coward’s classic (and very ...

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Review: Dracula by Different Stages

Review: Dracula by Different Stages

by Michael Meigs
Published on November 28, 2015

For those like my sixth-grade friend Charlie who take Stoker and Shelly as serious as the Kabbala, this one's a must-see.

I met -- and avoided -- Dracula at an early age. Mly sixth-grade friend Charlie was fascinated by the classic narratives of Gothic horror, Bram Stoker's Dracula and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. He pressed them upon me, but their quaint and creepy 19th century style was too much. Reading their prose was like pulling a dust-laden velvet curtain back to look for a corpse in a coffin. Later I absorbed the 'horror movie' images of ...

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Review: When The Rain Stops Falling by Different Stages

Review: When The Rain Stops Falling by Different Stages

by Michael Meigs
Published on July 08, 2015

The playwright, director and cast achieve something beyond mere storytelling. They touch our emotions deeply and evoke the biggest questions and mysterious interconnections of human life.

Andrew Bovell's When the Rain Stops Falling is an extraordinary piece of writing. Norman Blumensaadt's staging of it at the Vortex is an astonishing feat of theatre. This is a far journey into a mystery and into unknowing: there's a puzzle to be unravelled at the core of it, but the real puzzle is the arbitrary and capricious nature of our very existence.

 

Does that sound obscure? These interconnected stories of ...

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