Reviews for Theatre en Bloc Performances

Review: Until The Flood by Theatre en Bloc

Review: Until The Flood by Theatre en Bloc

by Michael Meigs
Published on November 12, 2018

There's no artful conclusion or lesson in UNTIL THE FLOOD, unless it's the appeal simply to listen and understand the depth of feeling, the constraints, and the rigidities that underlie the insoluble problems of race, class, territory and perception.

We lost the first weekend of Until The Flood by Dael Orlandersmith (Donna Brown) due to illness, so this sensitive re-creation by Florinda Bryant was only briefly on view at the Vortex in Austin. Two weekends seemed insufficient, for this was an event that required thought to digest and would have benefited from more word of mouth.

 

The Saint Louis Repertory commissioned the playwright to create a work connected with the August 19, 2014 shooting ...

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Review: Cry It Out by Theatre en Bloc

Review: Cry It Out by Theatre en Bloc

by Brian Paul Scipione
Published on May 05, 2018

Theatre en Bloc consistently illustrates a ‘don’t back down’ ethos in all their productions, and CRY IT OUT is another great example of this. For those who like theatre that inspires conversation as well as entertains: this production is for you.

“We're connected, as women. It's like a spiderweb. If one part of that web vibrates, if there's trouble, we all know it, but most of the time we're just too scared, or selfish, or insecure to help. But if we don't help each other, who will?”

-Sarah Addison Allen

 

When one is trying to capture the spirit of a play in a review it is convenient to look ...

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Review #3 of 3: THE SECRETARY by Theatre en Bloc

Review #3 of 3: THE SECRETARY by Theatre en Bloc

by Michael Meigs
Published on March 30, 2018

In this play those who cling to the gun either murder without apology or face death by the gun, as in the endless horror of waiting in the final scene.

 

People all around us were laughing, as if somehow they were watching a completely different performance from the one being presented to us.

 

But it wasn’t, of course. Already during the first act of The Secretary at the Rollins Theatre last Saturday night I was wondering how our perceptions were differing from the people that Theatre en Bloc was successfully entertaining.

 

At the intermission Karen looked at me, misery in her eyes ...

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Review #2 of 3: THE SECRETARY by Theatre en Bloc

Review #2 of 3: THE SECRETARY by Theatre en Bloc

by Brian Paul Scipione
Published on March 27, 2018

Some supernatural things may be happening -- which is less important than the fact that at least half of the characters believe down to their immortal souls that they are.

 

                    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” ― Philip K. Dick

 

The Secretary is a multi-thematic play about the inter-relations of people working together, a local business’s communal responsibility, abusive marriages, crime and most significantly gun control.  While there are many hot button topics bandied about, the play is thoroughly enjoyable thanks to a constant ...

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Review #1 of 3: THE SECRETARY by Theatre en Bloc

Review #1 of 3: THE SECRETARY by Theatre en Bloc

by David Glen Robinson
Published on March 27, 2018

The audience learns quickly than more than one of these characters is certifiable, and the plot twists and turns around dementia until its unavoidably tragic end.

 

Trigger.  The word, both noun and verb, releases the catch on varied symbolism and events of heat, pith, moment, chaos, and consequence.  Theatre en Bloc’s production of The Secretary by Kyle John Schmidt, now playing at the Rollins Studio Theatre at the Long Center, explores the trigger on many levels, including that of weaponry that triggers itself seemingly without human agency. 

 

The timeliness of The Secretary is nearly perfect. The ...

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Review: Neva by Theatre en Bloc

Review: Neva by Theatre en Bloc

by David Glen Robinson
Published on February 20, 2017

Chilean playwright Guillermo Calderon provides a fairly rich multi-level text for this tragicomedy of failed revolution, and it's a performance vehicle for Liz Beckham. Dialogues carry all of the show.

 

NEVA by Guillermo Calderon is the imagining of life after Chekhov for his widow Olga Knipper, played by Liz Beckham. Knipper was an actress in the Moscow Art Theatre. Her opening monologue sets her in a rehearsal studio in St. Petersburg in 1905, six months after Chekhov’s death. She is worried, as all actors are, that she has finally lost it all, and that audiences will hate her for everything, especially her German origins ...

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