Reviews for Tex-Arts Performances

Review: Smokey Joe's Cafe by Tex-Arts

Review: Smokey Joe's Cafe by Tex-Arts

by Brian Paul Scipione
Published on February 19, 2018

Smokey Joe’s Café is a must-see for anyone who is a fan of the music of the fifties and sixties -- or anyone in need of a rollicking good time!

 

Pop music has evolved throughout the years but in one of is earliest incarnations it was constrained by an approximate three-minute song limit. Music historians point out that the reason for this is because a 45 record could only hold that much music, so in order to get your song on the radio you had to, in the words of Billy Joel “cut it down to 3:05.” Many songwriters of the time ...

Read more »

Review: Midlife! the crisis musical by Tex-Arts

Review: Midlife! the crisis musical by Tex-Arts

by Catherine Dribb
Published on February 23, 2012

While it’s clever and funny, Mid-Life! can be hard to stomach at times, let alone watch. But at least both genders get what’s coming to them.

Mid-Life!, the Crisis Musical, presented by TexArts for only one more weekend, is a funny, witty piece about colorful characters and the crises they face. Brothers Bob and Jim Walton wrote book, music, and lyrics for this musical review with no plot other than scenes of the characters as they progress (and digress) through their mid-lives. Mid-Life! features six outstanding cast members directed by Lenny Daniel, bringing talent to Lakeway from Dripping Springs, Austin ...

Read more »

Review: Ain't Misbehavin' by Tex-Arts

Review: Ain't Misbehavin' by Tex-Arts

by Michael Meigs
Published on April 06, 2011

The performers could have dropped out of a 1930's movie reel. Your atention will be captured by the mini-dramas of Waller's songs, staged in various combinations of performers and in fact accumulating a greater sense and even a narrative.

Ain't Misbehavin' is a lively and exciting all-music evening at Tex-Arts, Lakeway, a Fats Waller "musical show" as promised in the subtitle. You might for one brief moment think that you were in a welcoming dive in Harlem, east St. Louis or the South Side of Chicago, as those five attractive and energetic performers and four-piece band sing, dance and blast away in the close quarters of the Kam and James Morris theatre ...

Read more »

Review: The Glass Menagerie by Tex-Arts

Review: The Glass Menagerie by Tex-Arts

by Michael Meigs
Published on March 05, 2010

This play really belongs to the women. Babs George is haunting as Amanda Wingfield, the mother, as lustrous, elegant and outdated as a hurricane lamp. George herself is graceful, unlined and unbent, appearing almost too young to be their mother.

The Glass Menagerie is a memory play, narrator Tom Wingfield tells us in his opening soliloquy. Director Michael Costello and the gifted actors in this cast treat it as just that, a dream-like sequence of deeply felt events taking place in the shadowed, intimate space of Tex-Arts' Kam and James Morris Theatre out in Lakeway. 

For those who don't know or have forgotten this American classic: it's the late 1930s. A mother ...

Read more »

Review: Nunsense by Tex-Arts

Review: Nunsense by Tex-Arts

by Michael Meigs
Published on October 12, 2009

There's a mischievous joy in this cast, and we share their good time. This production has the Tex-Arts stamp on it, with highly accomplished vocals and lively stepping.

A third production of Nunsense within 13 months! The Georgetown Palace did it in August of last year; Austin's City Theatre put it on this past June; and now Tex-Arts in Lakeway has just finished a three-week run.I almost didn't go, but Taylor T. posted comments on the "upcoming" item on the ALT blog, not once but twice, and told me that there was something extraordinary going on out there. So I ...

Read more »

Review: Always, Patsy Cline, by Tex-Arts Lakeway

Review: Always, Patsy Cline, by Tex-Arts Lakeway

by Michael Meigs
Published on October 11, 2008

Playwright Ted Swindley weaves two very different strands for this presentation. The manic Louise, a clown of little insight, provides the narrative and the jokes. And Patsy sings.

Selena Rosanbalm is a great big bundle of vocal talent.She delivered again and again in the TexArts’ production of Always, Patsy Cline, blending with our memories of Patsy’s joy, melancholy, honky-tonk and hokum from the late 1950s and early 1960s.That was the time when that plucky little singer with the vibrant voice traveled from town to dusty town, earning her coins with a different band every night instead of staying in Nashville and watching ...

Read more »