Reviews for Georgetown Palace Theatre Performances

Review: Singin' in the Rain by Georgetown Palace Theatre

Review: Singin' in the Rain by Georgetown Palace Theatre

by Michael Meigs
Published on March 07, 2012

Watson's casting at the Palace has produced an exhilarating variation. Here the athlete is Kevin Oliver in the role of Cosmo. Jim Lindsay as Don Lockwood is smaller of frame and light on his feet; with such a natural grace he's a grown-up edition of one of those balletic Sharks from West Side Story

Gotta sing!   Gotta dance!   Those could be the rallying cries for the Georgetown Palace Theatre. Under the years of Mary Ellen Butler's artistic direction, this community institution in the elegantly refurbished movie house off the courthouse square has seen very little down time, given its eight-show season and its classes for adults and for young people. The staff and the unpaid actors and tech folk send familiar musicals and plays down the chutes one …

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Review: I Hate Hamlet by Georgetown Palace Theatre

Review: I Hate Hamlet by Georgetown Palace Theatre

by Michael Meigs
Published on January 17, 2012

I Hate Hamlet moves quickly, has a touch of wisdom, only a whiff of pathos, a good deal of tolerance for the acting profession, and plenty of laughs along the way.

You don't have to hate Shakespeare's Hamlet in order to enjoy this lighthearted romp, but it does help to have an appreciation for ghosts.  We're not talking about the grim visaged former king of Shakespeare's imagined Denmark, but about the much friendlier shade of the great tragedian John Barrymore. Once he appears after the obligatory set-up scenes of the television actor and his girlfriend moving into an ancient and remarkable old apartment in New York City, Kyle …

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Review: A Christmas Carol, the musical by Georgetown Palace Theatre

Review: A Christmas Carol, the musical by Georgetown Palace Theatre

by Michael Meigs
Published on December 30, 2011

A Christmas Carol demonstrated once again the extraordinary strengths of the Palace as a center for community arts, and this version of the redemption of irascible Ebeneezer preserved the message of the much beloved story.

Spirit, I have not been the man I ought to have been for this holiday season; caught up with the visit of family -- my brother from Tennessee for two weeks, then for Christmastide and for two birthday celebrations my venerable in-laws, my wife's brother and our two children with their respective significant others -- I did not reserve the time and space for thought and writing.   To my discomfort, I deliver this review …

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Review: Dirty Rotten Scoundrels by Georgetown Palace Theatre

Review: Dirty Rotten Scoundrels by Georgetown Palace Theatre

by Michael Meigs
Published on April 16, 2011

This show won't give you much to ponder, but it will keep throwing things at you until you laugh and smile.

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels is set in a mythic French Riviera, a delirious paradise that seems to be populated only by rich Americans, a couple of rival American con artists, and one charmingly corrupt French police chief.  It's a concept that would make the French laugh out loud.  Not that they don't have their own share of nutty cinematic visions, including le vieux Far West, but because this is Cannes as the returned GIs imagined it.  Or Monte Carlo …

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Review: Evita by Georgetown Palace Theatre

Review: Evita by Georgetown Palace Theatre

by Michael Meigs
Published on March 03, 2011

The voices are superb, the leads are very well cast both for appearance and for presence, and as usual the Palace fills the stage up with action, spectacle and dance. Movement is swift and convincing, and the director and cast make very good use of the turntable at center stage.

Evita offers not only the Georgetown Palace's usual high standards of performance, but also something more: a deglamorization of the Lloyd Webber/Rice tragic fairy tale.   Eva Duarte de Perón came from almost literally nowhere -- from a provincial Argentine town where she was one of several illegitimate children of a wealthy rancher.  She became leading lady, first lady and "Spiritual Leader of the Nation."   Lloyd Webber's score and Tim Rice's libretto have furnished us …

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Review: Scrooge, the musical by Georgetown Palace Theatre

Review: Scrooge, the musical by Georgetown Palace Theatre

by Michael Meigs
Published on December 02, 2010

Leslie Bricusse essentially does a Hanna-Barbera version of Charles Dickens' novella. Scrooge as Fred Flintstone -- loud mouthed, dim and aggressive in an oafish sort of way. But loveable, too, especially once he has been brought around by the visitations.

The Palace has once again put a gigantic effort into the casting, preparation and playing of its holiday musical.  As with Annie last year , Scrooge the Musical by Leslie Bricusse has a big cast -- 24 bio'd players plus 23 charmers in the three children's casts (designated Nickleby, Copperfield and Pickwick, recalling characters from Dickens).  Except for six principals, the roles are double- or triple-cast, a policy of sharing out that must have made coordination of the 26 performances akin to writing up …

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